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Old 02-10-2013, 10:02 PM   #1 (permalink)
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A few days ago there was a post with a link to "The Angry Vet." This was a poorly written blog where "the angry vet" stated health and behavioral issues related to neutering. While these may very well have been valid issues, his only address to unwanted mating was...more or less...a responsible pet owner can prevent unwanted mating. He, of course counts himself as a responsible pet owner. Yet, I doubt that his neighbor has a bitch in heat, because his neighbor may be slightly more responsible. I wonder if his intact dog, howls, scratches, cries and goes nuts because there is a bitch in heat nearby. No, because his neighbors spay there bitches.

Other articles posted to the same thread gave better evidence of health issues, but still failed to address any social issues at all. All of these amount to fodder for those who simply do not want to spay or neuter to use to support their less than educated views.

Did I want to castrate Ray? heck no. Did I want to tear out MiMi's reproductive organs...Good God NO. But it needs to be done in this world we live in. I could not have both Ray and MiMi, if they had not been sterilized...I would be having mixed breed puppies every six months and MiMi would be worn out.

When I was a kid we didn't have the option to sterilize our pets. We tried to protect our little minpin, but the terrior next door was motivated by all that testosterone and he nabbed her. That was okay, but it is not okay in a world where there are so many homeless dogs. It is not okay today. Humans have birth control that we did not have in my youth too.

It may be a good thing to educate people as to the actual health value, but, hey, they failed there too. Give us statistics relating to the life span of fixed dogs relative to the life span of intact dogs.

You know what, if it took two years off my dogs lives, as opposed to producing more puppies, I would still do it. Not that any of these articles claiming the health benefits of keeping your dog (especially) or (by the way) your bitch intact gave any evidence of a longer life span....only less indication of certain illness that might be due to lack of testosterone ...or less evidence...estrogen.

And....and a big darn and...they never once addressed the suffering an intact dog or bitch goes through when they have all those hormones rushing through their bodies with no outlet.

IRRESPONSIBLE. One sided.

I can't get it out of my head. I just had to rant. Please feel free to express whatever your opinion is on the topic. We learn by listening. We may disagree in the end, but to listen is to expand.
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Old 02-10-2013, 10:08 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Bravo Sylvie!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 02-10-2013, 10:17 PM   #3 (permalink)
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I feel the same. One can argue the pros and cons of health issues etc., but the reality is thousands and thousands of unwanted dogs are put down on the West coast alone. Theories are just that, theories. People are not even responsible enough to pick up after their dogs, how can they be responsible enough to take care of unaltered pets?


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Old 02-10-2013, 10:33 PM   #4 (permalink)
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This is a strong subject to debate. I think personally that any responsible pet owner can not have a dog spayed or neutered and not end up with unwanted puppies. Is it more work when the bitch in the home is in heat? Yes. Can they be separated as not to have puppies? Absolutely. I do think however there are not many of these types of responsible owners around. If there is a proven health benefit to not having them spayed or neutered that's wonderful. I think the type of Maltese owner's here on SM take such good care of their fluffs that if this proves to be better for their babies they would consider the two times a years for a couple of weeks worth the extra trouble. I would be interested in hearing more pros and cons on the subject from qualified Vets. Great post
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Old 02-10-2013, 10:50 PM   #5 (permalink)
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I had bichons in the early nineties. I was trying to delay spaying and neutering. When my girl went into heat I had my friends...who lived on the same block about 1/8 mile away take my boy. He wailed constantly. One night my friends dropped by for a minute. Boy ran like something one fire to meet girl...I ran like something on fire to separate them. They didn't tie. He was on her for maybe 2 seconds.

I kept telling my little girl that she was not pregnant. She kept saying, "Yes, mommy, I am. I have two baby girls growing inside my womb." It couldn't be possible. I kept telling her it was a false pregnancy....until her water broke. Then I believed that two seconds did produce two puppies. Fortunately, they where healthy puppies. Both bichons were good representations of the breed. The puppies were gorgeous and very easy to place in perfect loving homes. Even so, that was then and this is now.
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Old 02-10-2013, 11:02 PM   #6 (permalink)
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The first time I took baby Ivy into our vet he asked if I was going to have her spayed, and then gave me the statistics for the cancer risk for a dog that is spayed before her first season, after one season, and after multiple seasons. The risk jumped way up with each season she experienced and it was far less if she were spayed prior to ever going into season. I wish I had taken notes and could provide that information but I don't remember the statistics he gave me. But it gave me one more reason to know that spaying her was doing the right thing.
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Old 02-10-2013, 11:08 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Oh my. I too have had Schnauzers, male and female and never had a problem with them however we know all dogs personalities are different. I'm sure the breeders here on SM could share some funny and not so funny tales of keeping their fluffs separated. My male Schnauzer is 14 years old now and never neutered and never bothersome. I guess hes layed back and too old to care But no hes never acted like a stupid love sick male when a bitch was in heat. I had a rescue female cat years ago that came into heat and howled at the moon! There was no sleep to be had in our house. Needless to say she was spayed before she could ever come in heat again.
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Old 02-10-2013, 11:14 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IvysMom View Post
The first time I took baby Ivy into our vet he asked if I was going to have her spayed, and then gave me the statistics for the cancer risk for a dog that is spayed before her first season, after one season, and after multiple seasons. The risk jumped way up with each season she experienced and it was far less if she were spayed prior to ever going into season. I wish I had taken notes and could provide that information but I don't remember the statistics he gave me. But it gave me one more reason to know that spaying her was doing the right thing.
Now that's a very strong pro to having a female spayed. Thank's for sharing this.
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Old 02-10-2013, 11:32 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IvysMom View Post
The first time I took baby Ivy into our vet he asked if I was going to have her spayed, and then gave me the statistics for the cancer risk for a dog that is spayed before her first season, after one season, and after multiple seasons. The risk jumped way up with each season she experienced and it was far less if she were spayed prior to ever going into season. I wish I had taken notes and could provide that information but I don't remember the statistics he gave me. But it gave me one more reason to know that spaying her was doing the right thing.
That is what has been going on for years...and I think that, in the long run, it is a good thing. Vets list the health benefits of spaying and neutering to give us the added motivation to go through with something that is not easy. It isn't easy, but it it necessary in the world as it is today.

My complaint is with vets who speak out publicly about the health benefits of leaving your pet intact, then only address the social issues with a platitude about "responsible" pet owners. Yet, they don't even give a full picture of the health issues involved. They discuss the various diseases an animal might develope due to early loss of sex hormones, but they do not tell us at what age these diseases might develop. Perhaps the cancers that are more prevalent in sterilized dogs than intact dogs, are cancers that develop in very late age. This information was not given. I wonder why? Could it be that there are people in the world who so desire to make a statement that the whole truth is discounted in favor of the most provocative theory ?
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Old 02-10-2013, 11:42 PM   #10 (permalink)
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I can attest to the testosterone in a male dog. When I was little we had a terrier chihuahua mix (unneutered of course) who would sneak inside neighbors houses when a female dog was in heat. I remember my feelings being terribly hurt that he didn't want to stay with me and would immediately run back to the neighbors if I put him down. The neighbors would patiently carry him back home. I can't believe they were so nice about it.
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